Fall Fruits and Vegetables, Musician Matt Arthur, Handcrafted Leather Goods, and Alpaca Yarn at Saturday’s Riverwalk Market Fair

Fall fruits and vegetables, alpaca yarn and rovings, local favorite rocking folk blues musician Matt Arthur, and handcrafted leather goods are just some of what you’ll find at Northfield’s Riverwalk Market Fair on Saturday, October 12.

Martha's savory quiches at Riverwalk Market Fair

Martha’s savory quiches at Riverwalk Market Fair

Seasonal Produce From Local Farmers, Artisan Foods, Art and Fine Craft

Fall produce is abundant at Riverwalk.  Fall harvest lettuce, and spinach are on hand.  Expect to find kale, carrots, onions, potatoes, eggplant, hot peppers, bell peppers, cabbage, melons, pie pumpkins, and winter squash.  Zestar, State Fair, and Honey Crisp apples are currently available, with Haralsons available depending on the weather.  All produce at Riverwalk is grown by local farmers. Artisan foods include a variety of fresh-baked breads, pastries, tarts and quiches from Ruthie’s Kitchen, Martha’s Eats and Treats, Crack of Dawn Artisan Breads, and Rebecca’s Greek Kouzina.  Maria’s Taco Hut serves freshly made and wholesome Mexican food.

Watercolors, photographs, handcrafted leather goods, ceramics, glass art, hand crafted accessories, and jewelry are among the art and fine crafts for sale.  (For a complete list of the vendors scheduled for this Saturday visit www.RiverwalkMarketFair.org.)

Kelly Asada, leatherworker, of KD Asada Studio

Kelly Asada, leatherworker, of KD Asada Studio

Kelly Asada of KD Asada Studio, Handcrafted Leather Goods

Kelly Asada has been very busy since he started selling handcrafted leather goods this year at Riverwalk Market Fair.  Customers have been bringing him product ideas, like the cell phone sleeve he now carries.  Kelly’s best sellers are belts and a money clip with a center spring clip that hold bills neatly in place.  The clip is small and fits in a front pocket.  Other favorites are Kelly’s leather java cuff for hot coffee and custom dog collars.

Matt Arthur brings rootsy, country, rocking folk and blues to Riverwalk.

Matt Arthur brings rootsy, country, rocking folk and blues to Riverwalk.

Rootsy Rocking Folk Blues Musician Matt Arthur

Matt Arthur is a fiercely contrarian Southern Minnesota blind man with a voice that calls to mind Johnny Cash, John Darnielle, and Nick Cave.  Fresh off an August tour of the western US with band mates The Bratlanders, Matt will perform solo at Riverwalk Market Fair this Saturday.

Heavy on My Mind, Matt’s latest album with the Bratlanders, is awash in vintage Hammond organ, and the lean core of the band is fleshed out with pedal steel, barrelhouse piano, cello, violin, harmonium, and haunting harmony vocals.  Come hear Matt performing covers and original songs from his album in his own distinctive solo style at Riverwalk this Saturday.

Fossum Family Farm Alpacas and Alpaca Yarn

Vicki Fossum of Fossum Family Farms

Vicki Fossum of Fossum Family Farms

The Fossum family knows livestock.  Before they turned to raising alpacas, Kevin Fossum raised dairy and beef cattle, pigs, and sheep.  They began raising alpacas in 2003 and in no time they went from being a cattle farm to “the alpaca lifestyle.” When asked for a quote, Vicki wrote this thorough description of the Fossum Farm Alpaca operation.

“The two kinds of alpaca are Huacaya and Suri.  Huacaya fiber grows out from the alpacas body similar to sheep and the fiber has crimp to it.  Suri fiber grows down from the alpacas body and has individual locks and natural luster.  Suri is used more for fine, drapey or lacey items or woven into fine fabrics.  Huacaya has a little more memory to it so it is used for most anything from socks, hats, scarves, mittens.”

“Alpaca fiber is classed as a luxury fiber (like cashmere, mohair and angora) due to its fineness and relative scarcity. Although very fine, it is also a strong fiber so items will last a very long time, are extremely warm and wick moisture. Since alpaca has no lanolin, it is hypoallergenic.”

“We are now offering hand spun yarns from spinners around the world who are spinning our animals fiber as well

Hand dyed alpaca yarn from Fossum Family Farm.

Hand dyed alpaca yarn from Fossum Family Farm.

as yarn locally spun at a wonderful mill in Hastings.  I have developed an addiction to dyeing and have lots of hand dyed yarns and naturals (alpaca comes in 22 natural colors so a lot to choose from!).  We recently purchased a FeltLOOM and so will be featuring many items in the near future made from alpaca felt — purses, scarves, pillows, IPad/Kindle cases, insoles, and so on.  Our goal is to always use all our fiber; courser fiber for bird nesting silos, rugs, insoles, purses (things not against your skin) and fine, soft fiber for next to the skin items such as yarns, scarves, etc. Nothing goes to waste!”

“Life is always busy on the farm; 10 crias (babies) so far with 2 more to go.  We also brought in 10 more boarders so we will be up over 90 by the end of the year.  Add in the yaks and all their possibilities with fiber and meat and things will be staying busy for a long time…but that is what we love.”

Thank you, Vicki, for sharing the Fossum Family Farm with Riverwalk Market Fair.

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